The Casual Look of Indifference
this is from my former roommate’s new book, buy it

this is from my former roommate’s new book, buy it

murketing:

(via Bizarre Portraits of People With the Back of Their Heads as Beards)

boatporn:

This is me everytime I write/make something.
laventdunorde:

Now where’s my boat?

boatporn:

This is me everytime I write/make something.

laventdunorde:

Now where’s my boat?

THE POWER OF FLIGHT

casualnewyork:

is the day i can do this

whiteoutnews:

North Korean Marathon Ends In State-Mandated Tie
The North Korean government released a photo on Monday that it said showed Workers’ Party members all won the race. 

whiteoutnews:

North Korean Marathon Ends In State-Mandated Tie

The North Korean government released a photo on Monday that it said showed Workers’ Party members all won the race. 

eibenberger:

cambria k4· 1928 · yachtphotography © thomas eibenberger 2012

unconsumption:


In Baltimore, the fire-damaged, 30,000-square-foot historic American Brewery building sat empty for 30 years until a $24+ million renovation turned it into offices for Humanim, a non-profit social service agency. 

At the core of the building rises a multistory, 10,000-bushel grain silo constructed of stacked 2-by-6-foot yellow pine boards. This unique structure was maintained, given flooring, and opened up to make impromptu seating areas. Snaking through the building are what appear to be vestigial air ducts; periodic Plexiglas panels placed on them allow glimpses of an automated system of belts and scoops once used to convey grain to the upper floors. And on the first floor, a massive steel tank likely used to heat a mix of malted barley and water called “wort” has been carved up to serve as a curvilinear work area [pictured above]. Where large beer tanks were removed in the renovation, their diameters and positions are memorialized with gray circles of carpeting.

 The building, built in 1887, is on the National Register of Historic Places; following its reopening in 2009, additional redevelopment has taken place in the surrounding neighborhood.
Restoration architects: Cho Benn Holback + Associates. Photos, by Paul Burk, and building information via Urbanite Baltimore.

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on adaptive reuse here.

unconsumption:

In Baltimore, the fire-damaged, 30,000-square-foot historic American Brewery building sat empty for 30 years until a $24+ million renovation turned it into offices for Humanim, a non-profit social service agency. 

At the core of the building rises a multistory, 10,000-bushel grain silo constructed of stacked 2-by-6-foot yellow pine boards. This unique structure was maintained, given flooring, and opened up to make impromptu seating areas. Snaking through the building are what appear to be vestigial air ducts; periodic Plexiglas panels placed on them allow glimpses of an automated system of belts and scoops once used to convey grain to the upper floors. And on the first floor, a massive steel tank likely used to heat a mix of malted barley and water called “wort” has been carved up to serve as a curvilinear work area [pictured above]. Where large beer tanks were removed in the renovation, their diameters and positions are memorialized with gray circles of carpeting.

 The building, built in 1887, is on the National Register of Historic Places; following its reopening in 2009, additional redevelopment has taken place in the surrounding neighborhood.

Restoration architects: Cho Benn Holback + Associates. Photos, by Paul Burk, and building information via Urbanite Baltimore.

See also: Earlier Unconsumption posts on adaptive reuse here.